Sep 232014
 

I’ve been playing around with the Hyperlapse app from Instagram and took it on a walk down the pier at Imperial Beach:

This was hand-held and I didn’t make any efforts to keep the camera steady during my walk. I’m pretty impressed with the way it turned out and will definitely use it for some other experiments.

Sep 082014
 

I was lucky to join in on a quick flight over San Diego county. We flew west to the ocean, roughly following HW 8, then north along the coast to Carlsbad before heading east to Escondido and then south to return to the airport. There was a bit of haze over the ocean, but the weather was generally good while I was snapping some photos:

North Bluff Preserve

Leucadia

Carlsbad suburbs

Escondido from the air

Silverdome

Jul 242014
 

Looking north along the Lost Coast

Hikers on the Loast Coast Trail

Sandy dunes

Anna walking through wildflowers

Punta Gorda Lighthouse

Giant redwood

We have driven through Northern California on road trips before, but have never made the trek to what is known as the Lost Coast. The Lost Coast is a remote area of Northern California which has stayed very remote and undeveloped due to the considerable expense to bring infrastructure into the area as well as the low population (and depopulation during the 30’s, see wikipedia for more). We had the opportunity to spend a few days in the Petrolia area due to the invitation by a friend to stay at their familly cabin.

I can understand why there is a certain romance about the Lost Coast – it is gorgeous, and a glimpse into the past of what California was like many years ago. It attracts a certain type of person to live there year round, and is one of the few places in California where you will find a lot of road signs which have been used as target practice or the smell of skunky weed gardens wafting over high fences.

We hiked the beach route to the remote (and long since decommissioned) Punta Gorda Lighthouse. We had gorgeous weather and enjoyed some beautiful scenery on our hike, which was one of the more picturesque hikes I’ve ever done. A word of warning, however, the distance listed for the hike is deceiving. This is because a good portion of the hike takes place on sandy ground or dunes, which takes a significant amount of energy to walk on compared to a regular path. Rest assured, the effort is worth it.

Photos from The Lost Coast, Humboldt, California Gallery link
Photos from The Lost Coast, Humboldt, California Flickr link

Jun 122014
 

We hadn’t planned the timing of our visit to Monument Valley, but it turned out to be a perfect day. As the sun went down the valley turned a gentle pink and the full moon rose between the two mittens. The moon rise perfectly matched the sunset colors and we were treated to one of the best evening views imaginable.

Long shadows on the mittens Monument Valley sunset and moon rise between the West and East mittens

We relaxed, watched the stars, and then got up early to watch the sunrise. The sunrise was beautiful as well, and cast a different light on everything. After a quick breakfast we ventured out with a Navajo guide around the valley floor. Along the way we heard stories about the different areas, heard our guide play the flute, and saw unique sights like the Eye of the Sun petroglyph wall. I was worried it would all be a bit clichéd given the number of visitors, but it was genuine and memorable.

Sunrise over Monument Valley Cowboy photo op and Monument Valley's Three Sisters Monument Valley arch - Ear of the Wind

After exploring the valley some more we headed back to Page, AZ and signed up for one of the Antelope Canyon tours. The canyon is one of the most famous examples of a slot canyon and has been photographed countless times. The canyon is on Navajo land and as such we had a Navajo guide for our tour. The tour started with a back breaking ride through a dry creek bed to reach the entrance of the canyon, thankfully only a 15 minute drive or so. We were lucky to be the only group at that time in the canyon (it can be packed full of photographers) and were able to take our time to explore the beautiful bends and shapes.

Looking up through Antelope Canyon Antelope Canyon Horseshoe Bend

After exploring Antelope Canyon, we visited Horseshoe Bend and continued our way home via Sedona, AZ. The full photo albums for Monument Valley and Antelope Canyon can be found here:

Photos of Monument Valley and Antelope Canyon – chrisnelson.ca
Photos of Monument Valley and Antelope Canyon – flickr.com

As part of our road trip around the southwest we visited Bryce Canyon National Park and Zion National Park.

May 222014
 

Adobe recently released Lightroom Mobile, their tablet integration efforts for Lightroom desktops. In order to try the software for 30 days you need to be running Lightroom 5, going beyond that will require a Creative Cloud subscription (min version being Photoshop & Lightroom CC @ $10/month).

I was curious to see how well this would work, as Lightroom is a desktop heavy application focused on very large files & workflows. Thus far, only collections (and not smart collections) can be synchronized by selecting the Sync Collection icon which is available after signing in with an Adobe ID. After a collection has been set to synchronize, Lightroom begins to upload metadata and smaller versions of the images to their cloud. For my case I created three separate albums, and roughly 1k total RAW images in my Lightroom collection to synchronize. Once started the sync took about 30 minutes, which seems reasonable given the amount of data to upload.

After signing into the iPad app for Lightroom Mobile, it began to download the collections which had been uploaded. This seemed to go at about the same speed as the upload, and was completed roughly a half hour later.

Lightroom Mobile

After the collections have been synchronized, they are ready to be used. On first opening a collection you will see all photos available in a grid view.

Lightroom Mobile grid view

After selecting a photo, an initial low resolution version of the photo will be displayed, along with a spinning swirl to indicate the application is still working. After a variable amount of time (times seem to range from 3-10 seconds on my iPad 3) the image is displayed in a higher resolution format, and other details like ISO, f stop, and shutter are displayed. Adobe notes that older iPads such as mine have poor performance for this step compared with newer ones. The time to open files seemed to go down as it built an internal cache, so it may be one of those cases were opening an album and leaving it for a bit will improve overall performance.

Lightroom Mobile detail view

The photo can also be edited using some of the simple controls in Lightroom. Given the smaller screen and potentially questionable color representation (though Apple is better than most at this), this is probably more of a rough starting point for editing rather than a finishing touch.

Lightroom Mobile edit photo

Ultimately for me, the most useful feature of the app is swipe up and down to flag or un-flag photos for quick editing of a group of photos. Unfortunately there is not currently any ability to see or edit meta data elements like captions, tags, or other elements. This is sorely lacking. Updating meta data can be one of the more time consuming and bothersome parts of photography, and having the ability to add or edit when I have some downtime would be a nice addition. Until then, $10/m for mobile functionality (as I already own the desktop version of Lightroom) doesn’t quite make sense.

Oct 202013
 

A month back I finally got around to getting back in the water for some diving. I had just splurged on a large purchase – the Nauticam underwater housing for my Olympus OMD EM5 camera. I just had the kit lens and housing in this instance, and no strobes or lights attached. Some first impressions:

  • It is heavy.  My previous experiences have been with plastic body housings and this has a very different feel underwater and above.  I’ll need to think about adding some floats to achieve neutral buoyancy.
  • It is well made.  Everything is very well fitted together and machined, no need to worry about anything breaking on it.  All buttons are accessible and easy to use.
  • I’m going to use the LCD most of the time.  The housing has the option of using either the large live view LCD screen or the smaller viewfinder screen.  Thus far I find it much easier to use the larger screen with a mask

Next steps I need to get it fitted out with a tray, arm, strobe, and probably a video light of some sort as I have an existing one which can be converted.


May 102013
 

I came across a video on Vimeo which contained some lovely images of London in 1927 using an early prototype of color video. I was interested to know more and found that the video only covered a small part of the overall series named The Open Road created by Claude Friese-Greene. While the full video on youtube doesn’t have the addition of music, it is double the length and includes other areas not in the vimeo video:

It was particularly interesting to notice the ordinary – the early doubledecker buses, barges on the River Thames, flowers at the war monument, Petticoat Lane, and tourists watching the changing of the guard.