A quick look at Lightroom Mobile for iPad

Adobe recently released Lightroom Mobile, their tablet integration efforts for Lightroom desktops. In order to try the software for 30 days you need to be running Lightroom 5, going beyond that will require a Creative Cloud subscription (min version being Photoshop & Lightroom CC @ $10/month).

I was curious to see how well this would work, as Lightroom is a desktop heavy application focused on very large files & workflows. Thus far, only collections (and not smart collections) can be synchronized by selecting the Sync Collection icon which is available after signing in with an Adobe ID. After a collection has been set to synchronize, Lightroom begins to upload metadata and smaller versions of the images to their cloud. For my case I created three separate albums, and roughly 1k total RAW images in my Lightroom collection to synchronize. Once started the sync took about 30 minutes, which seems reasonable given the amount of data to upload.

After signing into the iPad app for Lightroom Mobile, it began to download the collections which had been uploaded. This seemed to go at about the same speed as the upload, and was completed roughly a half hour later.

Lightroom Mobile

After the collections have been synchronized, they are ready to be used. On first opening a collection you will see all photos available in a grid view.

Lightroom Mobile grid view

After selecting a photo, an initial low resolution version of the photo will be displayed, along with a spinning swirl to indicate the application is still working. After a variable amount of time (times seem to range from 3-10 seconds on my iPad 3) the image is displayed in a higher resolution format, and other details like ISO, f stop, and shutter are displayed. Adobe notes that older iPads such as mine have poor performance for this step compared with newer ones. The time to open files seemed to go down as it built an internal cache, so it may be one of those cases were opening an album and leaving it for a bit will improve overall performance.

Lightroom Mobile detail view

The photo can also be edited using some of the simple controls in Lightroom. Given the smaller screen and potentially questionable color representation (though Apple is better than most at this), this is probably more of a rough starting point for editing rather than a finishing touch.

Lightroom Mobile edit photo

Ultimately for me, the most useful feature of the app is swipe up and down to flag or un-flag photos for quick editing of a group of photos. Unfortunately there is not currently any ability to see or edit meta data elements like captions, tags, or other elements. This is sorely lacking. Updating meta data can be one of the more time consuming and bothersome parts of photography, and having the ability to add or edit when I have some downtime would be a nice addition. Until then, $10/m for mobile functionality (as I already own the desktop version of Lightroom) doesn’t quite make sense.

Poking the Bear

I finally got around to listening to Dan Carlin’s podcast titled Common Sense #270 – Poking the Bear which was published last week. It gets off to a slow start, but I think he does a great job of portraying the larger scope and the lead up which brings us to the situation today around Russia, Ukraine, and the USA. I highly recommend taking a listen if you are interested in learning more about the current environment and motivations.

Abandoned Rockefeller House on Saint Barthélemy Island

I’ve been asked to remove photos and descriptions of the property. The home was profiled in a 1983 Architectural Digest, and additional information about it is included in the article text:

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Cross border tourism in Baja Norte

Tijuana, Ensenada, Rosarito, Puerto Nuevo, Guadalupe Valley. Just a few of the Baja, Mexico destinations which used to be easy and popular day trips from San Diego. In the space of a few years major changes completely changed tourism near the border.  The first was increased security at the border by the Department of Homeland Security.  The pool of available tourists was dramatically lowered by requiring passports to cross into the USA from Mexico as roughly 1/3rd of Americans hold a passport (though growing).  This increased security also lead to an increase in border wait times.  Instead of spending an hour or perhaps two at the worst waiting at the border, there began to be an increase in three and four hour waits.  The second major impact to cross border tourism was an outburst of drug war related violence.  Though mostly targeted towards narcos and those working with them, this bloody war spilled over in several cases and fed fear and general distrust of Tijuana and other border cities.

Though the narco violence subsided in this area years ago, memories take much longer to dissipate.  Given time things are starting to turn around. Without the corruption of short term (and usually debauched) cash along Revolución, Tijuana and others have looked inward to reinvent themselves.  This change over the last few years has lead to them becoming a bit of a destination for foodies and culture lovers – attracting the like of Bourdain and others to explore the new Baja.

We used to visit the coast of Baja (Rosarito, Puerto Nuevo, and occasionally Guadalupe or even further south like Bahia de los Angeles) on a regular basis, going down for lunch and shopping before returning for the day.  With the border waits we had fallen out of the habit some time ago and had yet to pick it back up again – We finally got around to visiting one of our old standards with family on Sunday, lunch in Puerto Nuevo. The toll road was washed out so we spent time on the free road driving down. I was pleasantly surprised to see that much of the route was four lanes wide and in excellent shape. The shops along the road were in mixed shape – some still seeming to be going strong, others didn’t seem to have made it through the drought.  We spoke with a few shopkeepers who said business had been slowly picking up and they were hopeful for the future.  I think we will be picking our habit back up – Baja offers some excellent opportunities for day trips.

Link to the full gallery of photos
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